Review: Raggedy Angry – How I Learned To Love Our Robot Overlords

Review: Raggedy Angry – How I Learned To Love Our Robot Overlords


Album Review by Joey Legrand

Artist History

Hailing from Toronto, Canada RAGGEDY ANGRY create a highly polished blended arrangement of synthpop, punk, and edgy metal/rock.

Irvin Scabtree and Pressit began their musical journey in 2006 when they were only 17 years of age and released a 12 song debut released “Take Me, Break Me, Make Me Pretty”.

In 2008 Raggedy Angry completed their lineup with the additions of The Pull-Out Method on drums/percussion and lead guitarist Uncle Daddy, and bassist C-man. Which saw them complete their second release “Pestilence”, produced by Dave Ogilvie (NIN, Marilyn Manson, Skinny Puppy).

In 2009 Raggedy Angry were asked to support another infamous Toronto band “The Birthday Massacre” on their European tour and also toured across Canada with Die Mannequin.

Official Album Description:
Raggedy Angry’s new album, How I Learned to Love Our Robot Overlords, is the second Raggedy Angry album to be mixed by industrial mastermind Dave “Rave” Ogilvie (Skinny Puppy, Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson). It finds the Toronto-based electro-rock quintet narrowing in on a sound that started developing on the previous album, Pestilence: synth-heavy, raw and aggressive, yet tight and hooky as Hell. Ogilvie was hooked by Raggedy Angry’s mix of crunchy riffs and electronic hooks after hearing their 2007 debut Take Me, Break Me, Make Me Pretty.

Review

Track 01 – Wake
(4.5 / 5.0)

An absolutely amazing song to use as an alarm, as it’s haunting, creepy, and beautifully mechanical with a slow at first tempo that gradually increases with rubber band effects that make you feel like you’re being stretched from your subconscious.

Track 02 – Don’t Mess with the S.S.
(3.5 / 5.0)

Aggressive electro-rock at its finest wrapped and delivered with heavy and dark Synth

Track 03 – Burn Your Gods
(3.5 / 5.0)

The bridge in Burn Your Gods is catchy and will definitely grab your attention, a great mix of acoustic drums and electronic effects with stunning vocal effects.

Track 04 – Fire Engine Red
(3.5 / 5.0)

Talk about a rollercoaster of a ride, Fire Engine Red sways between attacking and blissful…brace yourself it’s an intense ride!

Track 05 – Sick Thoughts
(4.5 / 5.0)

There are some heavy influences of other bands in Sick Thoughts; so far if I had to choose, this would be the single to unleash on the masses.

Track 06 – My Escape
(4.0 / 5.0)

Do I dare call this a post-apocalyptic ballad? If you own Mechanical Animals by Marilyn Manson you’ll definitely appreciate My Escape and embrace it.

Track 07 – Take Me Home
(2.5 / 5.0)

Fast, angry, yet surprisingly harmonic

Track 08 – Easter Island Radiation
(4.0 / 5.0)

The intro to Easter Island Radiation is stellar with sonic guitar work and eerie vocals, ¾ ways through the song it reminded me of what a cassette tape sounded like when it was “eaten” and slightly distracted me.

Track 09 – Get Fucked
(4.0 / 5.0)

Rock on Raggedy Angry! You can’t help but think that Raggedy Angry had a blast creating this song…

Track 10 – Assimilate
(4.0 / 5.0)

Ok who swapped out Raggedy Angry for Prozzak?  This is a 180° switch that ironically works, I suppose this could be a hit single, but it’s deceptive as it’s not electro-rock, more electro-pop.

Track 11 – Superjet
(4.5 / 5.0)

Wow! (Rinse & Repeat)

Track 12 – Digital Hell
(2.5 / 5.0)

Opening with 16 bit video game sound bytes, Digital Hell manifests into audio hostile territory and is relentless.

Track 13 – Robot Love
(4.0 / 5.0)

A duet ballad that is both beautiful, and whimsical that will put a smile on your face.

Track 14 – Epilogue: Cheers

This is a 14 minute album closer so as I listen I have time to wrap it up.  How I Learned To Love Our Robot Overlords by Raggedy Angry was mixed by Dave Ogilvie who worked in the past with stars such as NIN, Skinny Puppy and Marilyn Manson which careful listeners will no doubt pick up on.  Some may say that there isn’t anything new here and move on, however you’ll be missing out on what is offered which is new sounds created with familiar tools delivered in a tongue and cheek sort of way.

Overall 4.0 / 5.0

Album Review by Joey Legrand

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